WADE IN THE WATER, CHILDREN

A MUST SEE FILM. – BOSTON GLOBE
A documentary by Elizabeth Wood, Gabriel Nussbaum and the film class at the first school to open in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina
Through a passionate mixture of private videos, uncensored interviews and school-day adventures, the children of New Orleans notoriously violent Central City neighborhood have created a riveting portrait of childhood at the heart of an ongoing American crisis.No one set out to make a film: six months after Katrina, two filmmakers moved to New Orleans with a free art program, intended to help students creatively express their thoughts in response to the chaos of the storm. Their documentary-film class at Singleton Charter School at the local YMCA invited students to take video-cameras home and tell their stories on their own terms. The results quickly transcended the classroom. 300 hours of deeply personal video-tape later, Wade in the Water, Children took shape.Through their own remarkably honest and unusual footage, we enter the students shuttered housing projects, fractured families, flooded homes and darkened streets. We discover a New Orleans that was a disaster long before Katrina, a place where role models are scarce and gun violence is normal. The children reveal a New Orleans that adults are afraid to discuss, and that a conventional film crew could never penetrate.Wade in the Water, Children offers a poetic and devastating look at life in the Crescent City through the eyes of its youngest citizens.
Through a passionate mixture of private videos, uncensored interviews and school-day adventures, the children of New Orleans notoriously violent Central City neighborhood have created a riveting portrait of childhood at the heart of an ongoing American crisis.

No one set out to make a film: six months after Katrina, two filmmakers moved to New Orleans with a free art program, intended to help students creatively express their thoughts in response to the chaos of the storm. Their documentary-film class at Singleton Charter School at the local YMCA invited students to take video-cameras home and tell their stories on their own terms. The results quickly transcended the classroom. 300 hours of deeply personal video-tape later, Wade in the Water, Children took shape.

Through their own remarkably honest and unusual footage, we enter the students shuttered housing projects, fractured families, flooded homes and darkened streets. We discover a New Orleans that was a disaster long before Katrina, a place where role models are scarce and gun violence is normal. The children reveal a New Orleans that adults are afraid to discuss, and that a conventional film crew could never penetrate.Wade in the Water, Children offers a poetic and devastating look at life in the Crescent City through the eyes of its youngest citizens.
Created and Filmed By:
The 6th and 8th Grade Documentary Film Class
Singleton Charter Middle School
 The Dryades YMCA, Central City,
New Orleans, LA
“A devastating, first-hand account of life 
in post-Katrina New Orleans, told from the mouths of babes who are surviving it under outrageous living conditions. Scalding stuff.” 
– NEW YORK NEWSDAY

“The images and observations are raw and often profound, and the resilience of the youngster to push ahead while living in conditions of extraordinary squalor and decay is difficult to forget.”
– FILMTHREAT.COM

“This film is especially important and powerful in how it intimately reveals the desperate situation before the storm, as well as afterward.”
– PAUL GOLDBERGER  
Essayist, The New Yorker & NY Times

“Wade in the Water, Children is one of the treasures salvaged from the levee failures.”
– THE NEW ORLEANS GAMBIT WEEKLY

“Without pretense, rhetoric, or analysis, their uncensored vision of life in Post-Katrina New Orleans is heart-rending.”
– THE EAST HAMPTON STAR, NEW YORK
“A great film.”
– AL GORE

“A story that is funny, bitter, profane and extraordinarily perceptive... the film is a searing and heartbreaking portrait of the failures of New Orleans to help its most disadvantaged citizens both pre and post Katrina.”
– EDUCATIONAL MEDIA REVIEWS ONLINE

“It is important that more people get to see this film. We never listen to children. Very courageous work. ”
– LANI GUINIER  
Civil Rights Scholar, Harvard

“This is why I started a film festival. I am so proud to have this film shown here.”
– TONI ROSS  
Founder, The Hamptons Int’l Film Festival

“A moving film.  Important, insightful, and rather heartbreaking in how little has changed.”
– KATHLEEN TURNER

“ it’s incredible... I want to hand a copy to 
everyone know. ”
– MAX SCHORR, Publisher, GOOD Magazine